About Me

Welcome to my blog. My name is Geoff Micks. I’m in my late-twenties, and I live in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. I graduated from the University of Toronto with a BA Honours with High Distinction in Journalism with a Double Minor in History and Classical Studies. I also have a diploma from Centennial College in Journalism. I have worked as a copy editor, paginator, graphic designer and production coordinator for a number of community newspapers for four years after graduating, and most recently as an industry conference producer.

I read a lot, both online and on that printed wood pulp stuff. I also write, and that’s a big part of why I started this blog.

When I was in school I used to write every day. I contributed, edited and/or founded a dozen student and community papers during that time. I’ve filled twelve notebooks so far with whatever takes my fancy. I have finished two novels of historical fiction, and I had a literary agent for a while, although we  parted ways a little over a year ago, and I’m now pursuing e-publishing.

In short, I used to write quite a lot, and I was happy doing it. Writing is a great and rewarding hobby that focuses the mind and leaves a little piece of yourself behind for the future to contemplate at its leisure, like a curio on a shelf.

When I finished college and university, I went out into the working world and I found new things to occupy my time. I’ve always taken pride in giving my job everything I have, and when I come home I have filled my life with friends and family, television and movies, reading, exploring Canada, collecting bars and beers, and singing karaoke. I took an art course. I taught people how to skate. I got serious about cooking as a hobby, gave it up, then took it up again. My writing fell away, though, and I missed it. In the last couple of years I really haven’t done too much more than rework what I’ve already finished, and I’ve decided that’s going to change. This blog is about coaxing me back into the habit of writing regularly.

I don’t (and won’t) be updating faceintheblue every day, or even every couple of days, but this is going to be one more ongoing project to make sure that I’m writing all the time somewhere in some form about something. I’ve been at it since October of 2009, and I would call the project a modest success thus far. As of October, 2011, I am just shy of 100,000 readers!

I admit I have a vague mission statement for this blog, but it is working for me at the moment. This blog isn’t about anything, really. I don’t have an agenda to push. I don’t consider myself an expert to be heeded or a resource to be utilized. I’m not going to make any lofty promises to be insightful. I’m not trying to change peoples minds on any given issue. I hope to publish anecdotes, stories, thoughts, and anything else that catches my interest. That’s my goal for this site: To share what I find interesting, in the hopes that you’ll find it interesting too.

I know in time I’ll build this site into something personal, something I can take pride in. Thanks for reading.

Cheers!

–Geoff

13 Responses to About Me

  1. Mike Steede says:

    Hi Geoff,

    Just came across your site and love what I’ve seen so far. I came across it after looking for the ‘daddy wait for me’ picture to send to a friend in the UK. My dad was an officer, commanding in the 1970′s, with the Royal Westminster Regiment in New Westminster. My great-uncle Burt was a steam tug captain, then a destroyer captain on the North Atlantic (later a coastal pilot out of Victoria). Other cousins that served in WW2 were Tony (senior officer with ‘The Green Howards’, an armoured division from Yorkshire), captured at Dunkirk – 6 years in a camp, Desmond, a battlefield surgeon who went over on D-Day, and George, a Hurricane pilot who died in ’41 while retraining for night fighter duty. When I visited his sister Muriel in Lewes, Sussex, then 94, she told me the only thing they were told was he had ‘flown into a hill in an English county without any hills’. A rather droll way of putting it, oui? Ironically, just came across your site after coming home from my son’s sea cadet annual (RCSCC Fraser – perpetuates a Canadian destroyer lost in WW2). He’s determined to go to the RMC in Kingston – we’ll see if he gets his grades up in the meantime!

    All the best / M

    • Hello Mike,

      Thanks for reading! Which destroyer did your Uncle Bert captain? My grandfather was a wireless operator on the HMCS Drumheller, a Flower-class corvette that did convoy runs for most of the war, then was switched over to indepedent duty escorted ships between ports in the lead up to D-Day. He was off the Normandy beaches on June 6, and was deafened in one ear by a salvo from the HMS Norfolk. He didn’t want to be put ashore, so he didn’t tell anyone, and he just worked his radio with one ear for the rest of the war.

      You’ve just come back from your son’s annual? I remember those well. I spent seven years in the air cadets from age 12 to 19. The cadets are a big, big help for an RMC application. If I remember correctly, his years in the cadets will count towards his pension if he makes the Canadian military his career after the five years you have to serve upon graduating from RMC. Here’s hoping his grades are good enough, as you say, but I’d also recommend he takes all the French he can, as that will also be a big help on his application.

      Cheers, and good luck to him!

      –Geoff

      • Mike Steede says:

        Hi again Geoff,

        Thanks for the pointers re: Kingston. My dad took courses there in the summers as a junior officer while and after doing the ROTC program at UBC, then serving in the signals corps under NATO command while in Germany for several years before I was born in ’62 (yes, I’m becoming an old fart very quickly!).

        Finding out the name of the destroyer, or possibly corvette (I was told destroyer, but who really knows at this point) would be extremely problematic. Uncle Burt and Aunt Isobel never had any children, with Burt passing away about ’65 and Isobel about five years later. They left everything to my father, who passed away suddenly in ’88, only 51 years old. Dad was the historian in the family and I have all the materials he left behind. Burt’s siblings, my grandmother and a brother who was a neurologist in Toronto, also predeceased Aunt Isobel, so at this point there is no one to go to for information other than the RCN archives.

        According to the government requirements, for me to get his service records I have to a) provide documentation as to his death, and b), the problematic part, a single piece of documentation that mentions both his name and mine and there being a relationship. So, basically this would be a massive task even if given allowance to use multiple documents backing up the family tree. It really is a shame when families don’t pass on the greatest detail they can, especially when it’s so important they need to be remembered and their contribution to us and our country is witnessed fully for the generations to come.

        But, we must take what we get and also take a lesson from that as well when we pass on our family stories. The only hard evidence I have of Burt’s existence is his pilotage authority ID from the ’50′s. Too bad… At least with cousin George the RAF provided me with the details of his night fighter training aircraft and its serial number. I sent them a letter back in the ’90′s early in the year, but never received a response. Then, in late November of that year, I received a letter with the details and dated November 11th. I was surprised by that point and very touched.

        Keep up the good work. It’s important for our younger Canadians to pick up the torch and carry on. I’ve bookmarked your page and look forward to reading through the archives!

        Best / Mike S.

      • jim o'neil says:

        hi, my dad served on the drumheller beginning in ’43, he spoke of the refit in new york, meeting jack dempsey the famous boxer in his bar, i haven’t met or corresponded with any others that may have known my father but would like to. if you know of any contacts i would like to get in touch with them as well as hear stories you may have
        jim o’neil, nova scotia, son of lewis, lou o’neil

  2. Stacey says:

    Hey found your profile on LinkedIn. Was interested in knowing how you like working as a conference producer. I am asking because I saw a posting that the Canadian Institute is looking for a conference producer and I wasn’t sure if I should apply.

  3. Just came across your site and love what I’ve seen so far. I came across it after looking for the ‘daddy wait for me’ picture to send to a friend in the UK. My dad was an officer, commanding in the 1970′s, with the Royal Westminster Regiment in New Westminster. My great-uncle Burt was a steam tug captain, then a destroyer captain on the North Atlantic (later a coastal pilot out of Victoria). Other cousins that served in WW2 were Tony (senior officer with ‘The Green Howards’, an armoured division from Yorkshire), captured at Dunkirk – 6 years in a camp, Desmond, a battlefield surgeon who went over on D-Day, and George, a Hurricane pilot who died in ’41 while retraining for night fighter duty. When I visited his sister Muriel in Lewes, Sussex, then 94, she told me the only thing they were told was he had ‘flown into a hill in an English county without any hills’. A rather droll way of putting it, oui? Ironically, just came across your site after coming home from my son’s sea cadet annual (RCSCC Fraser – perpetuates a Canadian destroyer lost in WW2). He’s determined to go to the RMC in Kingston – we’ll see if he gets his grades up in the meantime!
    +1

  4. Hey – you did some great reviews of our site. Since then we have added many more – we are up to 114 now. Fancy giving us another listen?

    db

    • Oh, I still listen regularly David. Please keep up the good work! I haven’t done a new review lately because it takes all day to do the article. That, and I’ve gotten a little frustrated that you keep changing your site’s address and the article links, so if I do a review, within a couple of months no one can actually hear what I’m referencing anymore.

    • New review is up and running, plus the old ones have been relinked to your new URLs. Cheers for the kick in the pants. keep up the good work!

  5. Mary Tod says:

    Saw your review of Bernard Cornwell … I’m researching top historical fiction authors, what makes their fiction so compelling. I’ve only read his Sword Song – you seem to know a lot about him (and you’re a fellow Torontonian). What do you think makes his stories a great read.

    • Sword Song is an interesting one to start (being the middle of a series and all). I’d recommend the Warlord Trilogy, which is his imaging of the Arthur story before the myths set in. He bases as much of the story as possible on the history, but he makes it a human story through characters you care about leading lives of adventure that force you to turn the page. I can’t think of the last Cornwell book I didn’t read in under two days. They aren’t savoured so much as devoured.

  6. Mick Theebs says:

    I stumbled upon this blog from reddit and I really enjoyed reading your Presidential Knife Fight entry. I looked at your books and I just wanted to say that what you’re doing is really cool and I hope everything works out for you.

  7. […] Geoff Micks’s blog can be found here if you want to see his predictions: http://faceintheblue.wordpress.com/about/ […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 224 other followers

%d bloggers like this: